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Citation Guide: Citation Styles

Why Cite Sources?

Citations

  • help you avoid plagiarizing.
  • show the careful work you have put into locating and exploring your sources thus allowing the reader to find your research sources.
  • provide evidence for your arguments and adds credibility to your work by demonstrating that you have sought out and considered a variety of viewpoints on a given topic.
  • allow you to acknowledge those authors who contributed to your learning and your work.
  • demonstrate that you understand  the economic, legal, and social issues surrounding the use of information, and access and use information ethically and legally

Cite Your Sources

What is Plagiarism?

The Oxford Dictionary of English defines plagiarism as "the practice of taking someone else's work or ideas and passing them off as one's own." http://oxforddictionaries.com/definition/plagiarism

Hampton University's policy on plagiarism

From Hampton University’s Code of Conduct

To practice personal, professional, and academic integrity, and to discourage all forms of d dishonesty, plagiarism, deceit, and disloyalty to the Code of Conduct

Personal, professional, and academic integrity is paramount to the survival and potential of the Hampton Family. Therefore, individuals found in violation of Hampton University's policies against lying, cheating, plagiarism, or stealing are subject to disciplinary action which could possibly include dismissal from the University. “

From Academic Policies and Procedures, HamptonU Online:

"A student must not intentionally adopt or reproduce ideas, words, or statements of another person without acknowledgement. Students must give due credit to the originality of others and honestly pay their literary debts and acknowledge indebtedness:
A. Whenever quoting another person’s actual words.
B. Whenever using another person’s ideas, opinion, or theory.
C. Whenever borrowing facts, statistics, or other illustrative
material - unless the information is common knowledge."

Contact Us

Phone: 757.728.6637
Email: ereference@hamptonu.edu

 


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